Art-Rated

Information

This article was written on 13 Oct 2012, and is filled under Interview.

Current post is tagged

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Artist Interview: Uwe Kowski

Uwe Kowski Die Dinge, 2012 Oil on canvas 205 x 235 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Die Dinge, 2012
Oil on canvas
205 x 235 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Art-Rated: What is your background? Were you always interested in pursuing the art, and in particular painting?

Uwe Kowski: I already experienced as a child that painting and drawing is the meaningful activity to me. Definitely also a certain talent played its part. Later on I portrayed family and friends and learned to enjoy the recognition for those drawings. That was an important aspect as well. In those days I did not know much about arts – except from some well-known old masters and a few classical modernists I did not know much.

AR: Did you study with anyone at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig that was especially influential?

UK: My friends, who partly studied there and are artist by now, had the biggest influence on me, though it was more of a personal not an artistic influence. One reason for deciding to make my way as an artist was the advantage that I did not have to compare myself with others, but to make my own way, my own path, at my own pace. In the 1990s I firstly got an impression what art could be and for a while I worked with different materials and tools, until I got back to the opinion that color (and drawing) is my original tool/way of expression.

Uwe Kowski Küche, 2012 Oil on canvas 210 x 310 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Küche, 2012
Oil on canvas
210 x 310 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

 

AR: In your older work, you also combine line and planes with text. Willem de Kooning famously started many of his paintings by painting one letter on the canvas that he would begin to abstract. One connective trend between the work from a few years ago and the current work is a sign paining sensibility – the marks float above the surface of the canvas to create an organic screen – did you have any training as a sign painter?

UK: After my graduation at highschool, before I started studying at the HGB in Leipzig, I was trained as a sign painter producing advertising signs with brush and paint. There were – except from screen printing – no computer-based tools like Plotter or the like in the GDR. Learning that trade was surely determining for the application of letters in my pictures. I see these words, or word fragments and letters as architectonical elements and anchors in these paintings. But to me an organic appearance was always eminently important, better – the organic character of a picture. The eye should be able to wander through that living organism, stay in motion.

Uwe Kowski Mein Zimmer (2), 2012 Oil on canvas 265 x 210 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Mein Zimmer (2), 2012
Oil on canvas
265 x 210 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

 

AR: In your most recent exhibition at EIGEN + ART you exhibited large paintings as well as several small watercolor drawings that are clearly related. Do you see a difference between making drawings and paintings?

UK: Of course there are obvious differences affecting the result, due to various tools that are used. A drawing is finished faster. The process itself is more spontaneous and concentrated in a different way. To rework things like on canvas is not appropriate here. Spontaneous and sketchy features are of great significance in the drawing and that in turn is important for the canvas. I am happy if it works out to implement some of those features in the painting. For me both techniques are equally important. It happens that I take some sort of note drawing an idea, to see certain colors or structures. Meanwhile the drawings (watercolor drawings) have become independent and exist purely like the canvas.

AR: The combination of drawing and painting allows your work to exist in abstract and representational spaces simultaneously. The way Phillip Guston combined the two also seems to have affected your work.  Are you still interested in excavating the intricate crossover between drawing and painting?

UK: For a long time I was not conscious about me combining both techniques, because it was always natural to me. Basically, I always did it like that. I do not want to intricate something with it. The use of tools complies with the pursuit of an idea of the picture. Of course it has something to do with playing and intuition, on the other hand I cannot do anything else in that moment. Of course, I want to be as close as possible to the vision of the idea that I myself only see vaguely, do not really know. I do not reproduce an inner picture that already clearly exists. It is always a walk on unknown ground. And sometimes it happens that you fail. I really appreciate Philip Guston’s work.

Uwe Kowski HALDE, 2012 Oil on canvas 210 x 265 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
HALDE, 2012
Oil on canvas
210 x 265 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

 

AR: What is your process? Is it the same for both the drawings and paintings?

UK: You surely mean the procedure how a picture develops. On canvas I do not distinguish between drawing and painting. That is not my duty. Sometimes there is a small sketch, but usually not. Then I directly start on canvas, sketchy, using the whole format, which becomes more compact little by little.


AR: The tiles of your works, such as ‘Mein Zimmer,’ suggest that this new work is made from observation, a departure from the semiotic elements found in your previous work. Is that correct?

UK:  There were also motives in older works that apparently arose from observations (“Fuchsjagd”, “Modellbahn”), but the term “observation” is not to be taken literally. It is more of an imagination of something, how I could have watched it, how I saw something. Those are compressed observations. Though it is right that in my current work I used painterly and graphically means more directly. I do not know yet, if I abandoned other things.

Uwe Kowski - Studio Shot

Uwe Kowski – Studio Shot

 

AR: Are you interested in how we perceive the world? I ask because I see a relationship between your work and David Hockney and Lucian Freud, and possible even Van Gogh. All three artists share a fascination with the intricacies of perception and its translation into paint. Does their work interest or influence you?

UK: That is an interesting question, too. And an important one. The way we perceive the world, is the way we influence it. I see that in reference to economic interests and their consequences, to the latest technological developments, you could say. That development goes and has always gone along with a change of perception, or which knowledge we give priority to, what we learn from that and what kind of development we pursue. In this respect complexity in perception is difficult, too. It requires willingness to look precisely in lots of directions. From those three artists I have seen Van Gogh the most. It was at that age, when I worked through the history of art for myself. Lucian Freud is really moving and I like to look at his paintings. But I cannot say that one of those three had a conscious characterizing impact on me. The translation of perception is the determining aspect for an artist. Sure, you can try not to let perception enter your work, but you cannot detach from perception. There are different ways to a transformation within my work. I mean that sometimes a result is achieved faster and sometimes it is a long process. Complexity in this case means that the seen merges with different thoughts into an image. This process often lasts while the painting develops.

AR: Are there particular things that inspire your works? Other artists? Literature? Music?

UK: Oh yes, many things can affect me. Then I have to evaluate, if I see it as disturbance or inspiration. Certainly, the day’s events have the strongest influence, that I read the newspaper or hear the news. That is an impact that drives me in the first place. It is an interaction of press photo’s and typical terms that take an inspiring effect. For example piles of rubbish, natural disasters, famines and so on. Other situations are really stimulating, too. If an idea occurs while reading a novel, for example, or if there is suddenly an inspiration while looking at  another artist’s work. That is rather rare, though. Otherwise, a knocking at my studio door can be very disturbing, or a friend’s glance at a painting, that is still in process, makes me insecure.

AR: What is next for you?

UK: Tomorrow morning 9 o’clock I will be in my studio and  then things will go on.

Uwe Kowski is represented by Galerie Eigen + Art –  http://www.eigen-art.com/
____________________________________________________________
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Jonathan Beer is a New York-based artist and writer. He began to write critically in 2010 while attending the New York Academy of Art for his MFA in Painting. His paintings have been exhibited at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts, Flowers Gallery, Boltax Gallery and Sotheby’s in New York. Jon is also a contributing writer for The Brooklyn Rail, ArtWrit and for Art Observed.
____________________________________________________________

Uwe Kowski Die Dinge, 2012 Oil on canvas 205 x 235 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Die Dinge, 2012
Oil on canvas
205 x 235 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

AR: Wie ist dein Hintergrund? Warst du schon immer daran interessiert, der Kunst nachzugehen, im Besonderen der Malerei?

UK: Die Erfahrung, dass Malen und Zeichnen für mich die eigentlich sinngebende Tätigkeit ist, habe ich schon als Kind gemacht. Sicher hat auch ein gewisses Talent seinen Teil dazu beigetragen. Später habe ich Verwandte und Freunde porträtiert und die Anerkennung auf diese Zeichnungen genießen gelernt. Das war auch ein wichtiger Aspekt. In dieser Zeit wußte ich noch nicht viel  von Kunst – außer Abbildungen einiger bekannter alter Meister und ein paar der klassischen Moderne  kannte ich noch nicht viel.

AR: Hast du an der Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig mit jemandem studiert, der dich besonders beeinflusst hat?

UK: Am meisten haben mich meine Freunde beeinflusst, die zum Teil auch dort studierten und heute auch Künstler sind, allerdings war der Einfluss eher  persönlich, als künstlerisch.   Einen Grund den Weg als Künstler zu gehen, sah ich unter anderem in dem Vorteil, mich nicht mit anderen messen (vergleichen) zu müssen, sondern meinen eigenen Weg, auf eigener Bahn, mit eigenem Tempo gehen zu können. Ich habe erst in den neunziger Jahren, also nach meinem Studium eine Vorstellung davon bekommen, was Kunst sein kann und habe eine Zeit lang mit anderen Materialien und Mitteln (Skulptur) gearbeitet, bis ich dann darauf zurückgekommen bin, dass die Farbe (und die Zeichnung) mein eigentliches Mittel ist.

Uwe Kowski Küche, 2012 Oil on canvas 210 x 310 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Küche, 2012
Oil on canvas
210 x 310 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

 

AR: In deinen älteren Arbeiten kombinierst du auch Linien und Flächen mit Text. Willem de Kooning fing bekanntermaßen viele seiner Bilder damit an, dass er einen Buchstaben auf die Leinwand malte, den er dann zu abstrahieren begann. Ein verbindendes Phänomen deiner Arbeiten von vor ein paar Jahren und der neueren Arbeiten ist ein Schild, das die Empfindsamkeit schmerzt – das Zeichen schwebt über der Oberfläche der Leinwand, um eine organisches Erscheinungsbild zu erzeugen – hattest du irgendein Training als Schildermaler?

UK: Nach meinem Schulabschluss, vor dem Studium an der HGB in Leipzig,  habe ich den Beruf des Schriftmalers gelernt, in dem  Werbeschilder mit Pinsel und Farben hergestellt (gemalt) wurden. Es gab damals, abgesehen vom Siebdruck, noch keine Computergestützten Hilfsmittel wie Plotter und Ähnliches in der DDR. Das Erlernen dieses Handwerks war sicher entscheidend für die Verwendung von Schrift in meinen Bildern. Diese Worte, oder Wortfetzen und Lettern sehe ich als  architektonische Elemente und Anker in diesen Bildern. Ausgesprochen wichtig war mir aber immer ein organisches Erscheinungsbild, besser – ein organischer Charakter des Bildes. Das Auge soll in diesem (lebendigen) Organismus wandern können, in Bewegung bleiben.

Uwe Kowski Mein Zimmer (2), 2012 Oil on canvas 265 x 210 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
Mein Zimmer (2), 2012
Oil on canvas
265 x 210 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

 

AR: In deiner neusten Ausstellung in der Galerie EIGEN+ART zeigst zu großformatige Malerei, wie auch einige kleine Aquarelle, die deutlich in Bezug zueinander stehen. Gibt es für dich einen Unterschied zwischen Malen und Zeichnen?

UK: Es gibt natürlich offensichtliche Unterschiede im Ergebnis, durch die  unterschiedlichen Materialien bedingt. Eine Zeichnung ist bei mir schneller beendet. Der Prozess ist spontaner und auf eine andere Art konzentriert. Das Überarbeiten wie auf einer Leinwand, ist hier nicht angebracht. Das Spontane und Flüchtige hat hier eine große Bedeutung für mich und das ist wiederum wichtig für die Leinwände. Ich sehe es schon gern, wenn es gelingt etwas von diesen Eigenschaften in der Malerei umzusetzen. In der Bedeutung hebe ich keine der beiden Techniken über die andere. Es kommt vor das ich in einer Art Notiz eine Bildidee zeichne um bestimmte Farben oder Strukturen zu sehen. Inzwischen haben sich die Zeichnungen (Aquarelle) verselbständigt und existieren genauso zweckfrei wie die Leinwände.

AR: Die Verbindung von Zeichnung und Malerei ermöglicht es deinen Werken genauso im Abstrakten, wie im Gegenständlichen zu existieren. Phillip Gustons Art, diese beiden Techniken zu verbinden, scheint auch einen Einfluss auf deine Arbeit zu haben. Ist es dir immer noch ein Anliegen, die durchaus komplizierte Verkreuzung von Zeichnung und Malerei aufzudecken?

UK: Es ist mir lange gar nicht bewusst  gewesen,  dass ich die beiden Techniken so verknüpfe, weil es für mich immer selbstverständlich war. Im Grunde habe ich das aber schon immer so getan. Ich will damit nichts aufdecken. Der Einsatz der Mittel richtet sich nach dem Streben einer Vorstellung vom Bild. Natürlich hat das auch was mit Spiel und Intuition zu tun, andererseits kann ich es zum jeweiligen Zeitpunkt gar nicht anders machen. Natürlich will so nah wie möglich an die Vision von Bildidee, die ich selbst nur unscharf habe, nicht genau kenne. Ich reproduziere ja kein inneres Bild, das schon klar vorhanden ist. Es ist immer ein Gang auf unbekanntes Terrain.  Und ab und zu kommt es vor das man scheitert. Phillip Guston schätze ich sehr.

Uwe Kowski HALDE, 2012 Oil on canvas 210 x 265 cm courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Uwe Kowski
HALDE, 2012
Oil on canvas
210 x 265 cm
courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin
Photo: Uwe Walter, Berlin

AR: Wie ist deine Vorgehensweise? Unterscheidet sie sich in Zeichnung und Malerei?

UK: Du meinst sicher die Vorgehensweise, wie ein Bild entsteht. Auf der Leinwand mache ich keine Unterscheidung zwischen Zeichnung und Malerei. Das ist ja auch nicht meine Aufgabe. Manchmal gibt es eine kleine Skizze, meistens aber nicht. Dann beginne ich direkt auf der Leinwand,  skizzenhaft, auf dem ganzen Format, was sich dann nach und nach verdichtet.

AR: Die Titel deiner Arbeiten, so wie “Mein Zimmer”, lassen vermuten, dass deine Arbeit aus Beobachtungen herrührt. In diesem Sinne verabschiedest du dich von den semiotischen Elementen deiner früheren Arbeiten. Ist das richtig?

UK: Es gab auch in früheren Arbeiten Motive, die scheinbar aus Beobachtungen entstanden sind   (“Fuchsjagd, “Modellbahn”), aber der Begriff “Beobachtung” ist hier nicht wörtlich zu nehmen. Es ist eher eine Vorstellung davon, wie ich etwas beobachtet haben könnte, wie ich etwas gesehen habe. Es sind komprimierte Beobachtungen. Richtig ist aber, dass ich in den neueren Arbeiten die malerischen und zeichnerischen Mittel unmittelbarer eingesetzt habe. Ob ich mich von anderen Dingen verabschiedet habe, weiß ich noch nicht.

Uwe Kowski - Studio Shot

Uwe Kowski – Studio Shot

 

AR: Interessiert dich, wie wir die Welt wahrnehmen? Ich frage, weil ich einen Bezug in deinem Werk zu David Hockney und Lucian Freud, und vielleicht sogar Van Gogh sehe. Alle drei verbindet die Faszination für die Komplexität unserer Wahrnehmung und ihrer Übersetzung in die Malerei. Ist ihr Werk von Interesse oder Einfluss für dich?

UK: Das ist auch eine sehr interessante Frage. Und eine wichtige. Wie wir die Welt wahrnehmen, so beeinflussen wir sie auch. Ich meine das z.B. in Bezug auf wirtschaftliche Interessen und deren Konsequenzen, man könnte auch sagen auf den technischen Entwicklungsstand bis jetzt. Der wurde und wird ja ständig begleitet von der Änderung der Wahrnehmung, bzw. welchem Wissen wir Priorität einräumen, was wir daraus schließen und was für eine Entwicklung wir anstreben. Insofern ist Komplexität in der Wahrnehmung auch schwierig. Das setzt die Bereitschaft voraus genau in viele Richtungen zu schauen. Von den drei genannten Künstlern habe ich Van Gogh wohl am meisten gesehen. Das geschah in dem Alter, in dem ich die Kunstgeschichte für mich durchgearbeitet  habe. Lucian Freud ist sehr bewegend und ich sehe gern Bilder von ihm. Ich kann aber nicht sagen dass einer von den dreien bewusst prägenden Einfluss auf mich hatte.    Die Übersetzung der Wahrnehmung ist für einen Künstler der entscheidende Aspekt. Man kann natürlich versuchen sie nicht einfließen zu lassen in seine Arbeit, aber man kann sich nicht von Wahrnehmung lösen. Die Wege zu einer Transformation sind innerhalb meiner Arbeiten unterschiedlich. Ich meine damit, dass das Ergebnis mal schneller erreicht ist und mal ist es ein langer Prozess.  Komplexität heißt in dem Fall, dass das Gesehene mit verschiedensten Gedanken zu einem Bild verschmilzt. Dieser Prozess setzt sich oft noch lange in das Bild hinein fort.

AR: Gibt es bestimmte Dinge, die deine Arbeiten beeinflussen? Andere Künstler? Musik?

UK: Oh ja, viele Dinge können mich beeinflussen. Da  muss ich oft abwägen, ob ich es als Störung oder als Befruchtung empfinde. Am meisten Einfluss hat sicher das Tagesgeschehen, das ich in der Zeitung lese oder in den Nachrichten höre. Das ist ein Einfluss, den ich zuerst als Antrieb bezeichnen muss. Da gibt es dann ein Zusammenspiel von Pressefotos und typischen Begriffen die inspirierend wirken. Z.B. Müllberge, Naturkatastrophen, Hungersnöte usw. Richtig befruchtend sind auch noch andere Situationen. Wenn beim Lesen eines Romanes eine Bildidee aufblitzt, z.B.,  oder beim Betrachten von Arbeiten anderer Künstler plötzlich eine Inspiration da ist. Das kommt aber eher seltener  vor. Andererseits kann ein Klopfen an meiner Ateliertür mich sehr stören oder der Blick eines Freundes auf ein Werk, das noch in Arbeit ist, mich verunsichern.

AR: Wie geht es bei dir weiter?

UK: Morgen um 9 Uhr bin ich wieder im Atelier und dann geht es weiter.

________________________________________________________
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Jonathan Beer is a New York-based artist and writer. He began to write critically in 2010 while attending the New York Academy of Art for his MFA in Painting. His paintings have been exhibited at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts, Flowers Gallery, Boltax Gallery and Sotheby’s in New York. Jon is also a contributing writer for The Brooklyn Rail, ArtWrit and for Art Observed.

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: